Fifty Fifty Sourdough

Written by Warwick Quinton. Posted in Wholewheat starter breads

The Fifty Fifty Sourdough has been in the family for many years now. It combines the flavour and goodness of wholewheat with the lightness and crustiness of white sourdough bread. I use my wholewheat starter to leaven it, and add more wholewheat to pre ferment for a whole day. This process is known as 'soaking', which softens the fibre in the grain. Then I build the rest of the dough using a white flour, and ferment this for another day.

This slow fermentation creates a depth and complexity of flavour in the bread which is quite unique, as well as very digestible. I love this bread with anything - but especially with  things like ricotta cheese and a nice berry jam. Or perhaps a wholegrain tahini. All good, and all delicious! 

Wholewheat Sourdough

Written by Warwick Quinton. Posted in Wholewheat starter breads

Wholewheat Sourdough

Wholewheat Sourdough is a bread with a long SourdoughBaker history, and very many incarnations. Of course, the first sourdough bread ever was quite possibly a wholegrain variety also, being a happy accident as a result of some wholegrain gruel being left to ferment on a hot rock in the sun many thousands of years ago - but that's a whole other story!

In my quest to make really digestible bread, I began at wholewheat a quarter of a century ago. Over time, I complicated things a bit, adding stuff for colour and taste like honey and malt. These days, I have gone back to good grain, water and salt - and no longer add anything else. The flavour from a long slow fermentation is quite unique, and speaks of the grain it comes from. Simple. I source good wholewheat flour from near Dubbo in NSW - not too far from where I bake - which is hammer milled. It's a lovely flour, with all the nutrition locked in.

Wholewheat Sourdough is about 750 grams in weight, and has a caramel coloured crust. It's really delicious with marmalade, or as a hearty accompaniment to your home made pumpkin soup. The flavour is honest and quite pronounced, as a result of over 72 hours of fermentation.